Tag Archives: Damasus of Rome

#374 – A History of the Catholic Church – Jerome Versus Ambrosiaster

After a brief examination of the 382 Synod of Rome and Damasus’ views on the primacy of the bishop of Rome, we look at the first part of Jerome’s work on the Vulgate – his revision of the Gospels. Today Jerome is praised for his work on what will become the official Latin version of the New Testament. However, that was not so much the case at the beginning.

Links:
Painting of Saint Jerome by José de Ribera

The Damasine List of Canonical Scriptures reputedly accepted at the 382 Synod of Rome

Resources on the Vetus Latina or Old Latin Scriptures

Peter Lorenz’ blog posts on Jerome, Ambrosiaster and their conflict over the validity of the Vetus Latina

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#374 – A History of the Catholic Church – Jerome Versus Ambrosiaster

#371 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

We look first at the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed that may have been adopted at the First Council of Constantinople and Emperor Theodosius’ moves against those deemed to be heretics. Then, we look at developments in the Western Church – especially at Bishop Damasus of Rome’s claims to greater authority.

Links:

Icon of Constantine and bishops holding Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

Comparison between the Nicene and Constantinopolitan Creeds

Proceedings of the 381 Council of Aquileia

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#371 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

#370 – A History of the Catholic Church – The First Council of Constantinople

Seeking to resolve the problems of the Churches of Constantinople and Antioch, Emperor Theodosius calls for a council. However, the results of the council reveal even greater tensions. Maximus the Cynic seeks to supplant Gregory Nazianzen as bishop of Constantinople.

Links:

Icon of the First Council of Constantinople

Letter of the Bishops at the First Council of Constantinople to the Bishops of the West

Canons of the First Council of Constantinople

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#370 – A History of the Catholic Church – The First Council of Constantinople

#369 – A History of the Catholic Church – Valens Falls/Theodosius Rises

Invading Goths cause chaos throughout the Eastern half of the Roman empire and cost the life of an emperor. But in Theodosius, the Nicene Christians find a new protector and there are signs of hope for a resolution of the Trinitarian Controversy.

Links:

Fr. Seraphim’s Amazon Wish List for Christmas

Image of emperors Valentian, Valens, Gratian and Theodosius

Map of Roman Empire between 376-378 showing Tervingi, Gruethungi, Huns and location of Adrianople.

Theodosius’ Cunctos Populos ordering all Christians to follow faith of Damasus of Rome and Peter of Alexandria.

John Lascaratos & Spyros Marketos, “Didymus the Blind: An unknown precursor of Louis Braille and Helen Keller”, Documenta Opthalmologica, 86, 1994, pp. 203-208.

Zeev Rubin, “The Conversion of the Visigoths to Christianity”, Museum Helveticum, 38 (1081), pp. 34-54.

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#369 – A History of the Catholic Church – Valens Falls/Theodosius Rises

#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians

Saints Macrina the Younger, Basil the Great, Saint Gregory of Nyssa and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, the Cappadocians, were some of the most influential theologians in the history of the Church – especially in the development of the doctrine of the Trinity. There lives bring together many of the themes we have already explored – the Christinization of the Roman elite, monasticism, and the role of the bishops. We also learn the importance of staying awake during Liturgy.

Image comparing Cappadocian and Augustinian understandings of the Trinity

Links:

Fr. Seraphim’s Amazon Wish List for Christmas

Photo of icon of Saints Basil, Gregory Nazianzen and Gregory of Nyssa by Badly Drawn Dad

Saint Macrina the Younger
Life by Saint Gregory of Nyssa

Saint Basil the Great
Writings of Saint Basil the Great
Altar of Saint Basil in St. Peter’s in Rome

Saint Gregory of Nyssa
Writings of Gregory of Nyssa
On the Soul and the Resurrection
“On the Soul and the Resurrection commentary

Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Orations of Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Statue of Saint Gregory in colonnade at Saint Peter’s in Rome

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians

#365 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop of a Divided City

The death of Jovian leads to the advent of the Valentinian Dynasty and the split of the empire between the pro-Nicene Valentinian in the West and his pro-Homoean brother Valens as ruler of the East. Divisions in the Church continue due to the Trinitarian Controversy. In Rome, Damasus and Ursinus struggle for power.

Links:

Image of conflict between supporters of Damasus and Ursinus by Jan Luyken in Tafereelen der eerste Christenen 1740.

Map of Roman Empire at time of Valentinian and Valens

Pages with images and information on Damasus’ Philocalian script

Damasus of Rome: The Epigraphic Poetry by Dennis Trout

Malcolm R. Green, “The Supporters of the Antipope Ursinus”, The Journal of Theological Studies, New Series, Vol. 22, No. 2 (October 1971), pp. 531-538.

Jacob A. Latham, “From Literal to Spiritual Soldiers of Christ: Disputed Episcopal Elections and the Advent of Christian Processions in Late Antique Rome”, Church History, 81:2 (June 2012), pp. 293-327.

Harry O. Maier, “The Topography of Heresy and Dissent in Late-Fourth-Century Rome”, Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geshichte, Bd. 44, H. 2 (2nd Qtr. 1995), pp. 232-249.

Marianne Sághy, “Scinditur in partes populous: Pope Damasus and the Martyrs of Rome”, Early Medieval Europe, 9 (3), 2000, pp. 273-287.

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#365 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop of a Divided City