#377 – A History of the Catholic Church – Brides of Christ

The rise of the ascetical movement brought with it the rise of the debate over the relative virtue of marriage versus celibacy. This debate became even more intense as the number of ascetics rapidly expanded in the fourth century and Virgins move to occupy an important position in the life of the Church.

Links:
Saint Piamun and her mother in an Egyptian village by Charles-Antoine Coypel

Tertullian On Exhortation to Chastity

Cyprian of Carthage On the Dress of Virgins

Gregory of Nyssa On Virginity

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#377 – A History of the Catholic Church – Brides of Christ

#376 – A History of the Catholic Church – Be Fruitful and Multiply

This week we begin a series of episodes on marriage and virginity. While the Christian understanding of marriage is rooted in the Old Testament and Jewish tradition, it is also influenced by the encounter with Greek and Roman Culture as it strives to promote the importance of unity between husband and wife and the the procreation of children. Moreover, the goodness of marriage in the Christian tradition is connected with the belief in the goodness of everything God created.

Links:
Gold-Glass “Medalion” of a Christian couple being crowned by Jesus. The Latin reads “Sweetheart, may you live [long]”

Jewish Seven Blessings
Tertullian’s Ad Uxorem
Gregory Nazianzen on the marriage ritual in the Eastern half of the Roman Empire

Paulinus of Nola’s Ode on Marriage can be found in Documents of the Marriage Liturgy, Collegeville: The Liturgical Press, 1992, pp. 30-39.

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#376 – A History of the Catholic Church – Be Fruitful and Multiply

#375 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Hebrew Verity

Having revised the Latin Gospels, Jerome undertakes the much heavier task of translating the Hebrew Old Testament. However, Jerome’s decision to reject the Septuagint is met with significant opposition. Moreover, Jerome’s work contributes to a changing understanding of what it means to be a monk.

Links:
Painting of Saint Jerome in his study by Antonello da Messina

Writings of Jerome, including commentaries

Jerome’s prefaces to his scriptural translations

Correspondence between Jerome and Augustine about his translations and the Septuagint

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#375 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Hebrew Verity

Catholic: Under The Hood Classics – Episodes 344-348

classics

Presenting more of the back episodes of the History of the Catholic Church series no longer on the main podcast feed.

Episodes in this volume:
#344 – The Illustres
#345 – The First Christian Basilica
#346 – Saint Peter’s and the Holy Sepulchre
#347 – The Mysteries
#348 – The Anchorites

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Catholic: Under The Hood Episodes 344 to 348

#374 – A History of the Catholic Church – Jerome Versus Ambrosiaster

After a brief examination of the 382 Synod of Rome and Damasus’ views on the primacy of the bishop of Rome, we look at the first part of Jerome’s work on the Vulgate – his revision of the Gospels. Today Jerome is praised for his work on what will become the official Latin version of the New Testament. However, that was not so much the case at the beginning.

Links:
Painting of Saint Jerome by José de Ribera

The Damasine List of Canonical Scriptures reputedly accepted at the 382 Synod of Rome

Resources on the Vetus Latina or Old Latin Scriptures

Peter Lorenz’ blog posts on Jerome, Ambrosiaster and their conflict over the validity of the Vetus Latina

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#374 – A History of the Catholic Church – Jerome Versus Ambrosiaster

Catholic: Under The Hood Classics – Episodes 339-343

classics

Presenting more of the back episodes of the History of the Catholic Church series no longer on the main podcast feed.

Episodes in this volume:
#339 – Constantine Stands Alone
#340 – New Rome
#341 – The Presbyter of Alexandria
#342 – The First Ecumenical Council
#343 – The Nicene Creed

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Catholic: Under The Hood Episodes 339 to 343

#373 – A History of the Catholic Church – Union with God

Last week, we heard Basil the Great’s advice for separation from the things of the world. This week, we hear the advice of Pseudo-Macarius and Gregory of Nyssa for praying constantly and entering into deeper union with God.

Links:
Icon of Gregory of Nyssa

The Spiritual Homilies of Pseudo-Macarius

Hieromonk Alexander Golitzin’s presentation A Testimony to Christianity as Transfiguration: The Macarian Homilies and Orthodox Spirituality

Comments on Gregory of Nyssa’s Life of Moses

Comments on Gregory of Nyssa’s Homilies on the Song of Songs

John Meyendorff, “St. Basil, Messalianism and Byzantine Christianity,” St Vladimir’s Theological Quarterly 28 (1980), 219-234.

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#373 – A History of the Catholic Church – Union with God

#372 – A History of the Catholic Church – Separation from the World

Amidst all the problems of the Trinitarian Controversy, we should not lose sight of the desire of all Christians to grow in holiness and closer to Christ. This week, we look at the advice of Basil of Caesarea for separating oneself from sin and joining oneself to Jesus.

Links:
Painting of Saint Basil dictating his rule by Francisco de Herrera

Life of Saint Theodora of Alexandria

Selections from the Rule of Saint Basil

Discussion of the different texts of Basil mentioned in this episode.

Joseph Ballan, “Basil of Caesarea on the Ascetic Craft: The Invention of the Ascetic Community and the Spiritualization of Work in the Asketikon,” The Heythrop Journal, LII (2011), pp. 559-568.

Charles A. Frazee, “Anatolian Asceticism in the Fourth Century,” The Catholic Historical Review, Vol. 66, No. 1 (Jan. 1980), pp. 16-33.

Anna M. Silvas, “Edessa to Cassino: The Passage of Basil’s Asketikon to the West”, Vigiliae Christianae, 56 (2002), 247-259.

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#372 – A History of the Catholic Church – Separation from the World

#371 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

We look first at the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed that may have been adopted at the First Council of Constantinople and Emperor Theodosius’ moves against those deemed to be heretics. Then, we look at developments in the Western Church – especially at Bishop Damasus of Rome’s claims to greater authority.

Links:

Icon of Constantine and bishops holding Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

Comparison between the Nicene and Constantinopolitan Creeds

Proceedings of the 381 Council of Aquileia

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#371 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed

#370 – A History of the Catholic Church – The First Council of Constantinople

Seeking to resolve the problems of the Churches of Constantinople and Antioch, Emperor Theodosius calls for a council. However, the results of the council reveal even greater tensions. Maximus the Cynic seeks to supplant Gregory Nazianzen as bishop of Constantinople.

Links:

Icon of the First Council of Constantinople

Letter of the Bishops at the First Council of Constantinople to the Bishops of the West

Canons of the First Council of Constantinople

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#370 – A History of the Catholic Church – The First Council of Constantinople