#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians

Saints Macrina the Younger, Basil the Great, Saint Gregory of Nyssa and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, the Cappadocians, were some of the most influential theologians in the history of the Church – especially in the development of the doctrine of the Trinity. There lives bring together many of the themes we have already explored – the Christinization of the Roman elite, monasticism, and the role of the bishops. We also learn the importance of staying awake during Liturgy.

Image comparing Cappadocian and Augustinian understandings of the Trinity

Links:

Fr. Seraphim’s Amazon Wish List for Christmas

Photo of icon of Saints Basil, Gregory Nazianzen and Gregory of Nyssa by Badly Drawn Dad

Saint Macrina the Younger
Life by Saint Gregory of Nyssa

Saint Basil the Great
Writings of Saint Basil the Great
Altar of Saint Basil in St. Peter’s in Rome

Saint Gregory of Nyssa
Writings of Gregory of Nyssa
On the Soul and the Resurrection
“On the Soul and the Resurrection commentary

Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Orations of Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Statue of Saint Gregory in colonnade at Saint Peter’s in Rome

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#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians

#365 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop of a Divided City

The death of Jovian leads to the advent of the Valentinian Dynasty and the split of the empire between the pro-Nicene Valentinian in the West and his pro-Homoean brother Valens as ruler of the East. Divisions in the Church continue due to the Trinitarian Controversy. In Rome, Damasus and Ursinus struggle for power.

Links:

Image of conflict between supporters of Damasus and Ursinus by Jan Luyken in Tafereelen der eerste Christenen 1740.

Map of Roman Empire at time of Valentinian and Valens

Pages with images and information on Damasus’ Philocalian script

Damasus of Rome: The Epigraphic Poetry by Dennis Trout

Malcolm R. Green, “The Supporters of the Antipope Ursinus”, The Journal of Theological Studies, New Series, Vol. 22, No. 2 (October 1971), pp. 531-538.

Jacob A. Latham, “From Literal to Spiritual Soldiers of Christ: Disputed Episcopal Elections and the Advent of Christian Processions in Late Antique Rome”, Church History, 81:2 (June 2012), pp. 293-327.

Harry O. Maier, “The Topography of Heresy and Dissent in Late-Fourth-Century Rome”, Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geshichte, Bd. 44, H. 2 (2nd Qtr. 1995), pp. 232-249.

Marianne Sághy, “Scinditur in partes populous: Pope Damasus and the Martyrs of Rome”, Early Medieval Europe, 9 (3), 2000, pp. 273-287.

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#365 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop of a Divided City

#364 – A History of the Catholic Church – Living as Levites

Athanasius influences the spread of monasticism in the West. Eusebius of Vercelli and Martin of Tours establish the first monasteries. The Church continues to expand its understanding of sainthood while at the same time fighting against veneration of “false martyrs”.

Links:

Statue of Martin of Tours cutting his cloak in half by Eva Kröcher

Sulpicius Severus’ Life of Saint Martin of Tours

Website of the Abbey de Ligugé – the first monastery Martin of Tours established and oldest monastery in Europe

Information and images of the now destroyed monastery of Marmoutier – in French

Information and images of Christian gold-glass

Information and images about Christian gems that were also popular relics from pilgrimages

Matheus Coutinho Figuinha, “Martin of Tours’ Monasticism and Aristocracies in Fourth-Century Gaul”, Revista Brasileira de História, v. 36, no. 71, Jan-April 2016, pp. 1-22.

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#364 – A History of the Catholic Church – Living as Levites

#363 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop and Monk

The increasing influence of monastic leaders brought with it increasing concern from the bishops as to whether these monks would be friend or foe. One bishop, Pope Athanasius of Alexandria, worked to bring these monastics under greater episcopal control so that their power could be used for the benefit, and not to the detriment, of the Church – at least as Athanasius perceived it.

Links:

Image of Syncletica of Alexandria

Life and Sayings of Abba Pambo

Life of Amma Syncletica, reputedly by Athanasius.

Mary Forman, OSB – Amma Syncletica: A Spirituality of Experience

Sayings of Amma Syncletica

Synod of Gangra

Athanasius’ Life of Saint Anthony

David Brakke – Athanasius and the Politics of Asceticism

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#363 – A History of the Catholic Church – Bishop and Monk

Catholic: Under The Hood Classics – Episodes 334-338

classics

Presenting more of the back episodes of the History of the Catholic Church series no longer on the main podcast feed.

Episodes in this volume:
#334 – Martyrs and Apostates
#335 – Tetrarchs and Traditors
#336 – In This Sign
#337 – The Rise Of Christendom
#338 – The Council Of Arles

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Catholic: Under The Hood Episodes 334 to 338

#362 – A History of the Catholic Church – Harp of the Holy Spirit

Saint Ephrem the Syrian wrote thousands of lines of poetry designed for the teaching of the faith. His work helped Christians to experience the mystery and power of the faith and he is one of Syriac Christianity’s greatest theologians.

Links:

Image of Ephrem the Syrian

Ephrem the Syrian’s “Hymns on Paradise”

Collection of works by Ephrem the Syrian

Benedict XV on Ephrem the Syrian

Benedict XVI on Ephrem the Syrian

Sidney H. Griffith, “A Spiritual Father for the Whole Church: The Universal Appeal of St. Ephrem the Syrian,” Hugoye: Journal of Syriac Studies, Vol. 1.2, 1998, pp. 197-220.

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#362 – A History of the Catholic Church – Harp of the Holy Spirit

#361 – A History of the Catholic Church – Kesate Birhan

The first half of the 4th century saw the continued expansion of Christianity into lands outside the Roman Empire. Ulfilas will bring homoean Arianism to the Goths. Frumentius will bring homoousianism to the Kingdom of Axum – modern Ethiopia. In the Sassanid Empire, Christians find themselves under a persecution that will dwarf anything experienced under Decian and Diocletian.

Links:

Image of Ulfilas

Map of Gothic Lands

The Gothic Alphabet of Ulfilas

The Our Father in Gothic

Map of Kingdom of Axum

The Our Father in Ge’ez

The Ezana Stone showing the adoption of Christianity by the Kingdom of Axum

Letter of Constantius II to King Ezana

On Ethiopia and the Ark of the Covenant

Stories of the Persian Martyrs

S. P. Brock, “Christians in the Sasanian Empire: A Case of Divided Loyalties”, Studies in Church History 18, 1982, pp. 1-19

Chistopher Haas, “Mountain Constantines: The Christianization of Aksum and Iberia”, Journal of Late Antiquity, 1.1 (Spring 2008), pp. 101-126.

Hagith Sivan, “Ulfila’s Own Conversion”, The Harvard Theological Review, Vol 89, No. 4, (Oct. 1996), pp. 373-386.

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#361 – A History of the Catholic Church – Kesate Birhan

Catholic: Under The Hood Classics – Episodes 329-333

classics

Presenting more of the back episodes of the History of the Catholic Church series no longer on the main podcast feed.

Episodes in this volume:
#329 – The Manifestation of Our Lord
#330 – The Thundering Legion
#331 – Marked With The Seal
#332 – The Illuminator and the Emperor
#333 – The Impious On Earth

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Catholic: Under The Hood Episodes 329 to 333

#360 – A History of the Catholic Church – Depicting the Power of Christ

After the death of Julian, we look at the brief reign of Jovian as well as important expressions of Christian culture at this time. The poetry of Faltonia Betitia Proba shows how Christians were able to use the styles of pagan authors such as Virgil to express Christian teaching. The Dogmatic Sarcophagus and the Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus show developments in the Christian representation of Jesus Christ and the Trinity.

Links:

Image of Faltonia Betitia Proba

On the Vetus Latina or Old Latin Bible

Selections from the poetry of Faltonia Betitia Proba – begins on page 170.

Writings of Apollinaris the Elder and Younger – Christus Patiens and the Psalms in Hexameter – both in Greek

Images of the Dogmatic Sarcophagus

Smarthistory video on the Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus

Wikipedia has several images of the Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus

Example of the adventus image of Marcus Aurelius

The Traditio Legis image

Images of Jesus and Christians as Sheep on Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus

The Projecta Casket with dedication to live in Christ along with images of Venus

The Hinton St. Mary Mosaic with image of Christ and of Bellerophon slaying the Chimerea

Cătălina Mărmureanu, Gianina Cernescu, Laura Lixandru, Early Christian Women Writiers: The Interesting Lives and Works of Faltonia Betitia Proba and Athenais-Eudocia, Bucharest 2008.

Sigrid Schottenius, “Typology and the Cento of Proba”, Quarderni Urbinati di Cultura Classica, Vol. 95, No. 2, (2010), pp. 43-51.

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#360 – A History of the Catholic Church – Depicting the Power of Christ

#359 – A History of the Catholic Church – You have won, Galilean

Julian continues his attack on the Christian Church and Athanasius attempts to end the schism of the Church in Antioch, but neither gets what they hoped for as Meletius of Antioch resists Athanasius and Julian falls in battle.

Links:

Image of Icon of Saint Mercurius slaying Julian

Julian’s anti-Christian Against the Galilaeans

The 360 Council of Constantinople’s Tomus ad Antiochenos

Maps showing Julian’s war on the Sassanids

A different image of Saint Mercurius slaying Julian

H. C. Teitler, “Ammianus, Libanius, Chrysostomus and the Martyrs of Antioch”, Vigiliae Christianiae 67, (2013) pp. 263-288.

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#359 – A History of the Catholic Church – You have won, Galilean