Tag Archives: Gregory of Nyssa

#465 – A History of the Catholic Church – Freedom in Christ

The complex interaction between Catholic teaching and the historic traditions of the Greco-Roman tradition on the particular issues of slavery and the treatment of the poor are the focus of this episode and help us to see the how Christianity affected and was affected by the surrounding culture.

Links:
Photo of mosaic of two Roman slaves carrying wine jars by Paschal Radique

CL de Wet The Punishment of Slaves in Early Christianity: The Views of Some Selected Church Fathers

Ilaria L.E. Ramelli – “Social Justice and the Legitimacy of Slavery” was a major source for this episode as was Peter Brown’s “Through the Eye of a Needle”.

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#465 – A History of the Catholic Church – Freedom in Christ

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#373 – A History of the Catholic Church – Union with God

Last week, we heard Basil the Great’s advice for separation from the things of the world. This week, we hear the advice of Pseudo-Macarius and Gregory of Nyssa for praying constantly and entering into deeper union with God.

Links:
Icon of Gregory of Nyssa

The Spiritual Homilies of Pseudo-Macarius

Hieromonk Alexander Golitzin’s presentation A Testimony to Christianity as Transfiguration: The Macarian Homilies and Orthodox Spirituality

Comments on Gregory of Nyssa’s Life of Moses

Comments on Gregory of Nyssa’s Homilies on the Song of Songs

John Meyendorff, “St. Basil, Messalianism and Byzantine Christianity,” St Vladimir’s Theological Quarterly 28 (1980), 219-234.

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To listen, just click on the link below:
#373 – A History of the Catholic Church – Union with God

#367 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Enemy of My Enemy

Basil tries to unite the homoousians and the homoiousians against Emperor Valens. However, despite Valens’ persecution of bishops and monks, Bishop Damasus of Rome and Paul II of Alexandria continue to mistrust Basil and his allies. Moreover, debates about the Holy Spirit compound the Trinitarian Controversy.

Links:

Fr. Seraphim’s Amazon Wish List for Christmas

Painting of The Mass of Saint Basil the Great by Pierre Subleyras – Emperor Valens is in attendance.

Statue of Athanasius in Saint Peter’s Basilica by Bernini – Athansius is second from left.

Basil’s “On the Holy Spirit”

Noel Lenski, “Valens and the Monks: Cudgeling and Conscription as a Means of Social Control”, Dumbarton Oaks Papers 58 (2004): 93-117.

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To listen, just click on the link below:
#367 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Enemy of My Enemy

#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians

Saints Macrina the Younger, Basil the Great, Saint Gregory of Nyssa and Saint Gregory Nazianzen, the Cappadocians, were some of the most influential theologians in the history of the Church – especially in the development of the doctrine of the Trinity. There lives bring together many of the themes we have already explored – the Christinization of the Roman elite, monasticism, and the role of the bishops. We also learn the importance of staying awake during Liturgy.

Image comparing Cappadocian and Augustinian understandings of the Trinity

Links:

Fr. Seraphim’s Amazon Wish List for Christmas

Photo of icon of Saints Basil, Gregory Nazianzen and Gregory of Nyssa by Badly Drawn Dad

Saint Macrina the Younger
Life by Saint Gregory of Nyssa

Saint Basil the Great
Writings of Saint Basil the Great
Altar of Saint Basil in St. Peter’s in Rome

Saint Gregory of Nyssa
Writings of Gregory of Nyssa
On the Soul and the Resurrection
“On the Soul and the Resurrection commentary

Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Orations of Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Statue of Saint Gregory in colonnade at Saint Peter’s in Rome

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#366 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Cappadocians