Category Archives: Spanish History

#383 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Problem of Priscillian – Part II

Priscillian’s triumphant return to Hispania does not last long. He faces renewed charges of heresy and sorcery and his fate is placed in the hands of the new emperor Magnus Maximus.

Links:
Photo of gem engraved with image of the Crucifixion courtesy of the British Museum.

Pope Leo I’s letter on the errors of the Priscillians

Augustine on Priscillians

Acts of the Council of Toledo [in Spanish]

Virginia Burrus, The Making of a Heretic: Gender, Authority, and the Priscillianist Controversy

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#383 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Problem of Priscillian – Part II

#382 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Problem of Priscillian – Part I

We start calling the bishops of Rome – the popes of Rome. Priscillian of Avila offers us an example of the challenges of the rising ascetical movement as bishop fights against bishop in Spain.

Links:
Photo of Gold-glass depiction of Jonah and the whale by Anne-Marie Bouché

More on Priscillian.

Various New Testament Apocrypha, including those that Priscillian would have used.

About the so-called Epistle of Saint Paul to the Laodiceans

Map of the Roman provinces in Hispania at the time of Priscillian. Priscillian and his main support was found in Spanish Galicia/Gallaecia.

Check out the other great Catholic podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

To listen, just click on the link below:
#382 – A History of the Catholic Church – The Problem of Priscillian – Part I

#248 – Retablos

The tradition and devotion of the Retablos show the common desire of Catholics to have physical and visual expressions of their faith. They also show how different cultures adopt these devotionals to express their own particular culture.

Links:
Example of Mexican and New Mexican Retablos
Examples of Peruvian Retablos
Example of a Spanish Retablos
Image of Peruvian Retablo by Patty Mooney

Be sure to check out the CUTH blog for more on the history of the Catholic Church
Facebook
Twitter

Also check out the other great podcasts at the Starquest Production Network

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#248 – Retablos

Today in Catholic History – Opus Dei begins

On 2 October 1928, while on a retreat, St. Josemaría Escrivá would receive what he called a divine inspiration to establish what would become the Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei. He saw people of all types seeking God amidst their ordinary life – everyone living so as to become a saint. He said, “I was 26, had God’s grace and good humor and nothing else. And I had to do Opus Dei.” Opus Dei was approved in 1950 by Pope Pius XII and established as a personal prelature in 1982. It contains today almost 100,000 people in more than 90 countries.

There is an upcoming film about St. Josemaría Escrivá called There Be Dragons.


On October 2, 1928, the feast of the Holy Guardian Angels – by now nearly forty years have gone by – the Lord willed that Opus Dei might be, a mobilization of Christians disposed to sacrifice themselves with joy for others, to render divine all ways of man on earth, sanctifying every upright work, every honest labor, every earthly occupation.
– St. Josemaría Escrivá

Today in Catholic History – The Battle of St. Quentin

On 10 August 1557, the combined forces of Spain and England defeated those of France at the Battle of St. Quentin. This was the first military victory of Philip II as King of Spain.

At this time, Philip II, also the Holy Roman Emperor, was allied with England as a result of his marriage to Queen Mary of England. Spain and France had been at war for some years over which country would have greater dominance over Europe.

The battle took place on the feast day of Saint Lawrence, so Philip constructed the palace El Escorial [now the Monastery of Saint Lawrence] as a memorial to the victory and in the saint’s honor. One tradition holds that palace was constructed in the shape of a gridiron which was the shape of the instrument of Lawrence’s martyrdom. Others argue that the palace was constructed in the shape of the Temple of Solomon. The palace was completed in 1584.

Spain’s victory did not have much of an effect on the kingdoms of France, Spain or England but it did enable the Duchy of Savoy to obtain its independence from France.

History of the Catholic Church in Guam

Guam News Watch has produced three short videos on the history of the Catholic Church in Guam which are worth watching:

Part I – The Blessed Diego
Part II – Santa Marian Kamalen – origins
Part III – Santa Marian Kamalen – WWII

#233 – Operation Mincemeat

In 1942, the British needed someone special to help ensure the success of the Allied invasion of Sicily. Major Martin was that person – he was dead and he was Catholic.

Links:
More on Operation Mincemeat
BBC History Magazine Podcast talked about Operation Mincemeat in October 2008

SaintCast on Fr. Maximilian Kolbe

CNMC Boston

Photo from cosas de huelva

Be sure to check out the CUTH blog for more on the history of the Catholic Church

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#233 – Operation Mincemeat

Today in Catholic History – Pope Alexander VI gives sovereignty of most of North and South America to Spain

On 4 May 1493, Pope Alexander VI issued the bull Inter caetera which granted to Spain sovereignty over all land from a pole-to-pole line 100 leagues west and south of any of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde Islands, unless it had previously been claimed by another Christian ruler. Therefore, Portugal retained control over Brazil but the rest of North and South America would fall under the sovereignty of Spain. Pope Alexander VI was himself born in Spain and generally very favorable to the Spanish government.

While Spain was pleased with this bull, Portugal was not as Inter caetera only mentioned Spain’s right to claim new territory – not the rights of the Portuguese. This disagreement would later be resolved with the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494.

While Spain and Portugal recognized this division of control, it was never accepted by the other European colonial powers.

More recently there has been a push by those who see the history of Spanish colonization as a disaster for the native peoples for a repeal of Inter Caetera. They accuse Inter Caetera of attempting to provide justification for a policy of subjugation and oppression. Indeed on Columbus Day/International Indigenous Peoples Day, some will burn copies of Inter Caetera in protest.

Inter Caetera
Modern day hostility to Inter Caetera

#221 – Chess Club

While Chess did not originate in Catholic culture, the culture of Catholicism certainly influenced the game and in turn Chess influenced the way Catholics understood their faith.

Links:
Chapter 16 of the “The Way of Perfection” by St. Theresa of Avila
Gautier de Coinci on the Virgin Mary as the Queen of Chess
Treatise on the Game of Chess by Fr. Pietro Carrera
Paolo Boi and the Devil
Play a game of Carrera Chess
Jewish Story – “The Pope’s Game of Chess”

For more see “Birth of the Chess Queen: A History” by Marilyn Yalom
The Immortal Game: A History of Chess by David Shenk

Help support the SQPN giving campaign!

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#221 – Chess Club

#199 – Doctor Illuminatus

llullitunes

Raymond Llull, a 13th century Franciscan blessed, with influence in theology, logic, computers, and even an appearance in Marvel Comics! Plus, when priests sing with sisters.

Follow me on Twitter!

The Portiuncula Indulgence

Photo of a Priest Hole from the Mary in Monmouth blog

SQPN Website and the Catholic New Media Celebration
If you can’t attend the CNMC, watch June 27 on UStream

Be sure to vote for your favorite Catholic Blogs and Podcasts for the Catholic New Media Awards

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon# 199 – Doctor Illuminatus