Category Archives: Eastern Catholic

#232 – The Union of Brest, Part II

In this episode, we finish our look at the history of the Union of Brest and the effects that it had upon the Orthodox Church in the Polish/Lithuanian Commonwealth, plus I talk about leaving Austria.

Links:
Articles Concerning Union with the Roman Church
Map of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1600

One of the best books on this subject matter is “Crisis and Reform: The Kyivan Metropolitanate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople, and the Genesis of the Union of Brest” by Fr. Borys Gudziak

Photo – Image of the medal Clement VIII struck after the Union with the Ruthenian Church was established

CNMC MMX Boston 2010

Be sure to check out the CUTH blog for more on the history of the Catholic Church

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#232 – The Union of Brest, Part II

#231 – The Union of Brest, Part I

In the late 16th century Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Orthodox bishops faced some serious problems and would conclude that union with the Roman Catholic Church was the best solution.

Links:
Articles Concerning Union with the Roman Church
Map of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1600

One of the best books on this subject matter is “Crisis and Reform: The Kyivan Metropolitanate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople, and the Genesis of the Union of Brest” by Fr. Borys Gudziak

Photo – Image of the medal Clement VIII struck after the Union with the Ruthenian Church was established

Be sure to check out the CUTH blog for more on the history of the Catholic Church

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#231 – The Union of Brest

Today in Catholic History – The Armenian Genocide

On 24 April 1915, 250 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders were arrested in Constantinople/Istanbul marking the beginning of the Armenian genocide that would eventually take the lives of one and a half million people. Another one half million would flee Turkey.

The Young Turk government that replaced the Ottoman Empire at the end of WWI sought to eliminate any non-Turkish elements of the population. The large Armenian population – which at that time numbered around two million was a major obstacle to the goals of the new government.

While the brunt of the genocide fell upon the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Armenian Catholics would see 19 eparchies, 156 churches and chapels, 110 missions, 148 schools, 32 monasteries and convents and six seminaries destroyed. 7 bishops, 130 priests and 47 nuns and as many as 100,000 Armenian Catholics died, including Blessed Ignatius Maloyan. Most Armenian Catholics would flee Turkey for Lebanon and Syria. The Armenian Catholic Patriarchate would be transferred to Bzoummar, Lebanon.

The Martyrdom of Blessed Bishop Ignatius Maloyan:

On June 3, 1915, Turkish soldiers dragged Bishop Maloyan in chains to court with twenty seven other Armenian Catholic personalities. The next day, twenty five priests and eight hundred and sixty two believers were held in chains. During trial, the chief of the police, Mamdooh Bek, asked the Bishop to convert to Islam. The bishop answered that he would never betray Christ and His Church. The good shepherd told him that he was ready to suffer all kinds of ill-treatments and even death and in this will be his happiness.

Mamdooh Bek hit him on the head with the rear of his pistol and ordered to put him in jail. The soldiers chained his feet and hands, threw him on the ground and hit him mercilessly. With each blow, the Bishop was heard saying “Oh Lord, have mercy on me, oh Lord, give me strength”, and asked the priests present for absolution. With that, the soldiers went back to hitting him and they extracted his toe nails.

On June 9, his mother visited him and cried for his state. But the valiant Bishop encouraged her. On the next day, the soldiers gathered four hundred and forty seven Armenians. The soldiers along with the convoys took the desert route.

The bishop encouraged his parishioners to remain firm in their faith. Then all knelt with him. He prayed to God that they accept martyrdom with patience and courage. The priests granted the believers absolution. The Bishop took out a piece of bread, blessed it, recited the words of the Eucharist and gave it to his priests to distribute among the people.

One of the soldiers, an eye witness, recounted this scene: “That hour, I saw a cloud covering the prisoners and from all emitted a perfumed scent. There was a look of joy and serenity on their faces”. As they were all going to die out of love for Jesus. After a two-hour walk, hungry, naked and chained, the soldiers attacked the prisoners and killed them before the Bishop’s eyes. After the massacre of the two convoys came the turn of Bishop Maloyan.

Mamdooh Bek then asked Maloyan again to convert to Islam. The soldier of Christ answered: “I’ve told you I shall live and die for the sake of my faith and religion. I take pride in the Cross of my God and Lord”. Mamdooh got very angry, he drew his pistol and shot Maloyan. Before he breathed his last breath he cried out loud: “My God, have mercy on me; into your hands I commend my spirit”.

Photo of the Memorial to the Armenian Genocide at the Armenian Catholic Patriarchate by Serouj
Armenian Genocide Museum
Armenian Catholic Church

The Byzantine Greek Catholic Monastery of Grottaferata

The Abbey of Santa Maria di Grottaferata was originally founded in 1024 by John XIX, so it predates the schism. Most of the original structures are gone.

As you can see, the inside of the church is very Romanesque –

But there is a nice Iconostasis – note the presence of the choir stalls

A closer look at the Icon of the Blessed Mother – Byzantine and Baroque/Rococo:

This is the baptismal font:

One of the original mosaics:

The millennial icon of the Blessed Mother for the monastery:

You can find out more about the monastery at its web site.

#223 – Philokalia

The collection of writings known as the Philokalia is often considered the second most important spiritual text for the Eastern Church after the Bible. Yet, the Philokalia is not just for the East – indeed it can be enriching for all Christians.

Links:
File of the Philokalia in .pdf format – link found at the bottom of the page
Several books offering a good introduction to the Philokalia can be found at Light & Life Publishing
Volume 1 of the English translation of the Philokalia can be found at Amazon.com as can the Writings from the Philokalia: On the Prayer of the Heart
Catholic:Under The Hood on the Jesus Prayer

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Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#223 – Philokalia

#218 – The Gregorian Calendar

Most of the world marks its time according the calendar instituted by Pope Gregory XIII but calendar reform is a tricky business.

Links:
Papal Bull “Inter Gravisimus” on the implementation of the Gregorian Calendar
“Hesitant steps: acceptance of the Gregorian calendar in eighteenth-century Geneva”
Dates various countries adopted the Gregorian calendar
Website for Our Lady of Soufanieh
Picture by Rsuessbr

Help support the SQPN giving campaign!

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#218 – The Gregorian Calendar

#212 – The Coming of the Great Monarch

constantineitunes

For centuries Catholics in Europe believed in the coming of a Great Monarch and a Final Pope who would foreshadow the End Times. This episode looks at these legends and what the Catholic Church teaches about prophecy.

Links:
Again, these prophecies have not been declared valid by the Magisterium and should be viewed with historical interest only

Prophecy of St. Malachy on the Popes

St. Constantine XI
Prophecy of Adso Montier-en-Der
Prophecy of Pseudo-Methodius

Catechism on the End Times – paragraphs 672-677

Photo of Constantine XI by Tilemahos Efthimiadis

Follow my audioboos while I’m in Rome and Assisi

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#212 – The Great Monarch

#211 – Catholic Schools versus the KKK

catholicschool

In the 1920’s the Ku Klux Klan tried to shut down Catholic and other private schools in Oregon in the name of protecting American values. The effects of this would go all the way to the Supreme Court and help define human rights in the United States even today. Plus, the Eucharistic Prayer in the East and the West

Links:
Pierce vs Society of School Sisters Supreme Court Decision
The Ku Klux Klan’s attempts to abolish Catholic Schools in Washington and Oregon

See also:
David B. Tyack. “The Perils of Pluralism: The Background of the Pierce Case,”American Historical Review, Vol. 74, No. 1 (Oct., 1968), pp. 74–98

Plus a new book coming out on the case:
Cross Purposes by Paula Abrams

Follow my audioboos while I’m in Rome and Assisi

Send e-mail questions and comments to catholicunderthehood@gmail.com or leave voice mail at 1 740 936 4354

To listen, just click on the link below:

podcasticon#211 – Catholic Schools versus the KKK